Complete the following MATLAB Exercise. The attached file has instructions and questionsMATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
MAT 343 Laboratory 1
Matrix and Vector Computations in MATLAB
In this laboratory session we will learn how to
1. Create matrices and vectors.
2. Manipulate matrices and create matrices of special types
3. Add and multiply matrices
Preliminaries
The MATLAB Desktop Display
The MATLAB default desktop consists of four windows: the command window, the Current Directory
Browser, the Workspace Browser, and the Command History.
• The command window is where MATLAB commands are entered and executed.
• The Current Directory Browser allows you to view MATLAB and other files and to perform file
operations such as opening and editing or searching for files.
• The Workspace Browser allows you to view and make changes to the contents of the workspace.
• The Command History allows you to view a log of all the commands that have been entered in the
command window. To repeat a previous command, just click on the command to highlight it and
then double-click to execute it. You can also recall an edit command directly from the command
window by using the arrow keys. From the command window, you can use the up arrow to recall
previous commands. The commands can then be edited using the left and right arrow keys. Press
the Enter key of your computer to execute the edited command.
Any of the MATLAB windows can be closed by clicking on the × in the upper right corner of the
window. To detach a window from the MATLAB desktop, click on the arrow that is next to the x in
the upper right corner of the window.
Help Facility MATLAB includes a HELP facility that provides help on all MATLAB features.
• doc: if you type doc in the command window the MATLAB’s help browser will open (alternatively
you can click on the Help button in the Home toolbar .)
• help : if you know the exact name of a function, you can get help on it by typing help functioname.
For example, typing help help provides help on the function help itself.
• lookfor: If you are looking for a function, use lookfor keyword to get a list of functions with the
string keyword in them. For example, typing lookfor ’identity matrix’ lists functions (there
are two of them) that create identity matrices.
If you have never used MATLAB before, we suggest you type demo at the MATLAB prompt. Click
on Getting Started with MATLAB and run the file. Then move on to the demo on Working in the
Development Environment and the demo on Working with Arrays.
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Stefania Tracogna, SoMSS, ASU
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
Matrices in MATLAB
Entering matrices in MATLAB is easy. For example, to enter the matrix


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

A=
 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16
type A=[1, 2, 3, 4; 5, 6, 7, 8; 9, 10, 11, 12; 13, 14, 15, 16]
or the matrix could be entered one row at a time:
A=[ 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16]
Once a matrix has been entered, you can edit it. Here are some examples:
Input
Output
A(1,3) = 5
A =
C = A(2:3,2:4)
A(:,2:3)
A(4,:)
E = A([1,3],[2,4])
1
5
9
13
2
6
10
14
5
7
11
15
6
10
7
11
8
12
4
8
12
16
Submatrix consisting of the entries in rows 2 and 3 and
columns 2 through 4
C =
Submatrix of A consisting of
all the elements in the second
and third columns
ans =
2
6
10
14
3
7
11
15
ans =
13
14
Fourth row of A
E =
2
10
Changes the third entry in the
first row of A to 5
4
12
15
16
Matrix whose entries are those
which appear only in the first
and third rows and second and
fourth column of A
Vectors
Vectors are special cases of matrices, with just one row or one column. They are entered the same way
as a matrix. For example
u = [1, 3, 9] produces a row vector
v = [1; 3; 9] produces a column vector.
Row vectors of equally spaced points can be generated with MATLAB’s : operation or using the
linspace command.
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Stefania Tracogna, SoMSS, ASU
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
Input
Output
x =
2
x = 2:6
3
4
5
row vector with integer entries going
from 2 to 6
6
x =
x = 1.2:0.2:2
1.2000
1.4000
1.6000
1.8000
2.0000
1.2000
1.4000
1.6000
1.8000
2.0000
x =
x = linspace(1.2,2,5)
Row vector with
stepsize 0.2
Row vector with 5
equally spaced entries between 1.2
and 2
Generating Matrices
We can also generate matrices by using the built-in MATLAB functions. For example, the command
B=rand(4)
generates a 4 × 4 matrix whose entries are random numbers between 0 and 1. Here is a list of the most
common built-in matrices:
rand(m,n)
eye(m,n)
zeros(m,n)
ones(m,n)
triu(A)
tril(A)
diag(v,k)
m by n matrix with random numbers between 0 and 1
m by n matrix with 1’s on the main diagonal
m by n matrix of zeros
m by n matrix of ones
extracts the upper triangular part of the matrix A
extracts the lower triangular part of the matrix A
square matrix with the vector v on the kth diagonal
The first four commands above with a single argument, e.g. ones(m), produce a square matrix of
dimension m.
More special matrices:
There is also a set of built-in special matrices such as magic, hilb, pascal, toeplitz, and vander.
The matrix building commands can be used to generate block of partitioned matrices. Here is an
example:
Input
E=[eye(2),ones(2,3);zeros(2),[1:3; 3:-1:1]]
Output
E =
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
Addition and Multiplication of Matrices
Matrix arithmetic in MATLAB is straightforward. We can multiply our original matrix A times B
simply by typing A*B. The sum and difference of A and B are given by A + B and A – B, respectively.
The transpose of the real matrix A is given by A’.
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Stefania Tracogna, SoMSS, ASU
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
Exponentiation
Powers of matrices are easily generated. The matrix A5 is computed in MATLAB by typing A^5. We
can also perform operations element-wise by preceding the operand by a period.
For instance, if V=[1,2; 3,4], then
Input
Output
ans =
V^2
7
15
10
22
component-wise exponentiation
ans =
V.^2
1
9
4
16
Appending a row or a column
A row can be easily appended to an existing matrix provided the row has the same length of the rows
of the existing matrix. The same thing goes for the columns. The command A=[A, v] appends the
column vector v to the columns of A, while A = [A; u] appends the row vector u to the rows of A.


 
1 0 0
2

Examples: If A = 0 1 0, u = 5 6 7 , and v = 3, then
0 0 1
4

1
0
• C = [A; u] produces C = 
0
5
0
1
0
6

0
0
, a 4 × 3 matrix
1
7

1
• D = [A, v] produces D = 0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1

2
3, a 3 × 4 matrix.
4
Deleting a row or column
Let A=[1, 2, 3, 4, 5; 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; 11, 12, 13, 14, 15], then
Input
A(2,:)
Output
= []
deletes the 2nd row of matrix A
A =
1
11
A(:,3:5) = []
A([1,3],:)
= []
2
12
3
13
4
14
5
15
deletes the 3rd through 5th
columns of A
A =
1
6
11
2
7
12
6
7
deletes the 1st and 3rd row of A
A =
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Stefania Tracogna, SoMSS, ASU
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9
10
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
Columnwise Array Operators
MATLAB has a number of functions that, when applied to either a row or column vector x, returns
a single number. For example, the command max(x) will compute the maximum entry of x , and the
command sum(x) will return the value of the sum of the entries of x. Other functions of this form are
min, prod, mean. When used with a matrix argument, these functions are applied to each column vector
and the results are returned as a row vector.


−3 2 5 4
For example if A =  1 3 8 0, then
−6 3 1 3
Input
Output
min(A)
ans =
max(A)
sum(A)
prod(A)
-6
2
1
0
minimum entry in each column
of A
1
3
8
4
maximum entry in each column of A
-8
8
14
18
18
ans =
sum of the entries in each column of A
ans =
7
ans =
40
0
product of the entries in each
column of A
EXERCISES
Instructions
You will need to record the results of your MATLAB session to generate your lab report. Create a
directory (folder) on your computer to save your MATLAB work in. Then use the Current Directory
field in the desktop toolbar to change the directory to this folder. Now type
diary lab1.txt
followed by the Enter key. Now each computation you make in MATLAB will be save in your directory
in a text file named lab1.txt. When you have finished your MATLAB session you can turn off the
recording by typing diary off at the MATLAB prompt. You can then edit this file using your favorite
text editor (e.g. MS Word).
Lab Write-up: Now that your diary file is open, enter the command format compact (so that when
you print out your diary file it will not have unnecessary spaces), and the comment line
% MAT 343 MATLAB Assignment # 1
Put labels to mark the beginning of your work on each part of each question, so that your edited lab
write-up has the format
% Question 1
.
.
% Question 2 (a)
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
Final Editing of Lab Write-up: After you have worked through all the parts of the lab assignment
you will need to edit your diary file.
• Remove all typing errors.
• Unless otherwise specified, your write-up should contain the MATLAB input commands, the corresponding output,
and the answers to the questions that you have written.
• If the question asks you to write an M-file, copy and paste the file into your diary file in the
appropriate position (after the problem number and before the output generated by the file).
• If the question asks for a graph, copy the figure and paste it into your diary file in the appropriate
position. Crop and resize the figure so that it does not take too much space. Use “;” to suppress
the output from the vectors used to generate the graph. Makes sure you use enough points for
your graphs so that the resulting curves are nice and smooth.
• Clearly separate all questions. The questions numbers should be in a larger format and in boldface.
Preview the document before printing and remove unnecessary page breaks and blank spaces.
• Put your name and class time on each page.
Important: An unedited diary file without comments submitted as a lab writeup is not
acceptable.
1. Entering matrices: Enter the following matrices:

2 6
1 2
A=
, B=
,
3 9
3 4

C=
−5
5
5
3

2. Check some linear algebra rules:
(a) Is matrix addition commutative? Compute A + B and then B + A. Are the results the
same?
(b) Is matrix addition associative? Compute (A + B) + C and A + (B + C) in the order
prescribed. Are the results the same?
(c) Is multiplication with a scalar distributive? Compute α(A + B) and αA + αB, taking
α = 5 and show that the results are the same.
(d) Is multiplication with a matrix distributive? Compute A(B + C) and compare with
AB + AC.
(e) Matrices are different from scalars!
(i) For scalars, ab = ac implies that b = c if a 6= 0. Is that true for matrices? Check by
computing AB and AC for the matrices given above.
(ii) In general, matrix products do not commute either (unlike scalar products). Check if AB
and BA give different results.
3. Create matrices with zeros, eye, ones, and triu: Create the following matrices with the
help of the matrix generation functions zeros, eye , ones, and triu. See the on-line help on these
functions if required (i.e. help eye)

0
M=
0
0
0

0
,
0

5
N = 0
0
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Stefania Tracogna, SoMSS, ASU
0
5
0

0
0 ,
5

3
P =
3
3
3


1
Q = 0
0
1
1
0

1
1 .
1
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
4. Create a big matrix with submatrices: The following matrix G is created by putting matrices
A, B, and C from Exercise 1, on its diagonal and inserting 2 × 2 zeros matrices and 2 × 2 identity
matrices in the appropriate position. Create the matrix using submatrices A, B, C, zeros and
eye (that is, you are not allowed to enter the numbers explicitly).


2 6 0 0
1 0
 3 9 0 0
0 1 


 0 0 1 2
0 0 

G=
 0 0 3 4
0 0 


 1 0 0 0 −5 5 
0 1 0 0
5 3
5. Manipulate a matrix: Do the following operations on matrix G created above in Problem 4.
(a) Extract the first 4 × 4 submatrix from G and store it in the matrix H, that is, create a matrix


2 6 0 0
 3 9 0 0 

H=
 0 0 1 2 
0 0 3 4
by extracting the appropriate rows and columns from the matrix G.
(b) Replace G(5,5) with 4.
(c) What happens if you type G(:,:) and hit return? Do not include the output in your lab
report, but include a statement describing the output in words.
What happens if you type G(:) and hit return? Do not include the output in your lab report,
but include a statement describing the output in words.
(d) What do you get if you type G(7) and hit return? Can you explain how MATLAB got that
answer? Try G(16) to confirm your answer.
(e) What happens if you type G(12,1) and hit return?
(f) What happens if you type G(G>5) and hit return? Can you explain how MATLAB got that
answer? What happens if you type G(G>5) = 100 and hit return? Can you explain how
MATLAB got that answer?
(g) Delete the last row and the third column of the matrix G.
6. See the structure of a matrix: Create a 20 × 20 matrix with the command A = ones(20);
Now replace the 10 × 10 submatrix between rows 6:15 and columns 6:15 with zeros. See the
structure of the matrix (in terms of nonzero entries) with the command spy(A).
Set the 5 × 5 submatrices in the top right corner and bottom left corner to zeros and see the
structure again.
NOTE: Use semicolon to suppress the output for all the matrices in this problem. In your lab-write
up include the pictures obtained with the spy command. To include the pictures, open your diary
file using a word processor such as MS Word then, on the MATLAB figure, select “Edit” and “Copy
Figure”, and paste the picture into the Word file. Make sure you crop and resize the picture so
that it does not take up too much space.
7. Create a symmetric matrix: Create an upper triangular matrix with the following command:
A = diag(1:6) + diag(7:11, 1) + diag(12:15, 2)
Make sure you understand how this command works (see the on-line help on diag). Now use the
upper off-diagonal terms of A to make A a symmetric matrix with the following command:
A = A + triu(A,1)’
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MATLAB sessions: Laboratory 1
This command takes the upper triangular part of A above the main diagonal, flips it (transpose),
and adds to the original matrix A, thus creating a symmetric matrix A. See the on-line help on
triu.
8. Do some cool operations: Create a 10 × 10 random matrix with the command A = rand(10);
Now do the following operations:
(a) Multiply all elements of A by 100 and store the result in the matrix A. Then round off all
elements of the matrix to integers with the command A = fix(A).
(b) Replace all elements of A that are less than 10 with zeros (Hint: see exercise 5(f))
(c) Replace all elements of A > 90 with infinity (inf)
(d) Extract all 30 ≤ aij ≤ 50 in a vector b, that is, find all elements of A that are between 30
and 50 and put them in a vector b. (Hint: the logical operator & (AND) may be useful).
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Stefania Tracogna, SoMSS, ASU
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