Summarize the article overall in the form of an abstract statement
Describe the speaker’s main points (two to three paragraphs minimum)
Explain whether you agree or disagree with any of the points made and why (two paragraphs minimum)
Analyze the social or ethical issues involved from your vantage point
Finally, list 10 nuggets of information you found interesting or did not knowBUA 3305: MIS Analysis and Design

Summary Report Assignments Guidelines and Rubric

Overview:​ Summary report assignments will be assigned in several modules throughout the course. The resources assigned for these
assignments are intended to provide thought-provoking, technology-relevant content that the textbook does not address. The textbook for this
course presents a general survey of timeless information about systems analysis and design, without specific concentration in any particular
technology area. The resources in these assignments will expose you to specific real-world technology-related concepts that are beyond the
scope of the text and are intended to connect basic system concepts to provocative theories, and in some cases, cutting-edge technologies.

Directions: ​For each summary report assignment, you will write a summary report analyzing the main arguments of the assigned article or video.

To complete this assignment, address the following critical elements in a written summary report:

● Summarize the article overall in the form of an abstract statement. This should be a succinctly written summary (two or three sentences)
to aid the reader in discerning the article or video’s purpose.

● Describe the main points (two to three paragraphs minimum)
● Explain whether you agree or disagree with any of the points made and why (two paragraphs minimum)
● Analyze the social or ethical issues involved from your vantage point
● Finally, list 10 nuggets of information you found interesting or did not know

Guidelines for Submission:​ Your summary report must be submitted as a two- to three-page Microsoft Word document plus a title page, with
double spacing, 12-point Times New Roman font, and one-inch margins. Resources outside of the assigned article are not required.

Instructor Feedback:​ This activity uses an integrated rubric in Blackboard. Students can view instructor feedback in the Grade Center.

Rubric
Criteria Exemplary (100%) Needs Improvement (75%) Not Evident (0%) Value

Summary

Summarizes the resource overall in the form
of an abstract statement.

Summarizes the resource overall in the form
of an abstract statement, but lacks in clarity.

Does not summarize the resource overall in
the form of an abstract statement.

15

Main Points Describes the speaker’s main points. Describes the speaker’s main points, but lacks
in detail or clarity.

Does not describe the speaker’s main points. 15

BUA 3305: MIS Analysis and Design

Evaluation of
Main Points

Explains agreement or disagreement with any
of the points made and why.

Explains agreement or disagreement with any
of the points made and why, but lacks in detail
or clarity.

Does not explain agreement or disagreement
with any of the points made and why.

20

Social or
Ethical Issues

Analyzes the social or ethical issues involved. Analyzes the social or ethical issues involved,
but lacks in detail or clarity.

DoesHBR AT LARGE

Doesn’t
Matter

by Nicholas C.Carr

As information technology’s power and ubiquity have

grown, its strategic importance has diminished. The

way you approach IT investment and management will

need to change dramatically

I N 1968, ayoung Intel engineernamedTed Hoff found a way to put the cir-cuits necessary for computer process-
ing onto a tiny piece of silicon. His in-
vention of the microprocessor spurred a
series of technological breakthroughs-
desktop computers, local and wide area
networks, enterprise software, and the
Internet-that have transformed the
business world. Today, no one would dis-
pute that information technology has
become the backbone of commerce. It
underpins the operations of individual
companies, ties together far-flung sup-
ply chains, and, increasingly, links busi-
nesses to the customers they serve.
Hardly a dollar or a euro changes hands
anymore without the aid of computer
systems.

As IT’S power and presence have ex-
panded, companies have come to view it
as a resource ever more critical to their

success, a fact clearly reflected in their
spending habits. In 1965, according to a
study by the U.S. Department of Com-
merce’s Bureau of Economic Analysis,
less than 5% of the capital expenditures
of American companies went to infor-
mation technology. After the introduc-
tion of the persona] computer in the
early 1980s, that percentage rose to 15%.
By the early 1990s, it had reached more
than 30%, and by the end of the decade
it had hit nearly 50%. Even with the re-
cent sluggishness in technology spend-
ing, businesses around the world con-
tinue to spend well over $2 trillion a
year on IT.

But the veneration of IT goes much
deeper than dollars. It is evident as well
in the shifting attitudes of top manag-
ers. TXventy years ago, most executives
looked down on computers as prole-
tarian tools – glorified typewriters and

MAY 2003 41

HBR AT LARGE • IT Doesn’t Matter

calculators-best relegated to low level
employees like secretaries, analysts, and
technicians. It was the rare executive
who would let his fingers touch a key-
board, much less incorporate informa-
tion technology into his strategic think-
ing. Today, that has changed completely.
Chief executives now routinely talk
aboutthe strategic value of information
technology, about how they can use IT
to gain a competitive edge, about the
“digitization” of their business models.
Most have appointed chief information
officers to their senior management
teams, and many bave hired strategy
consulting firms to provide fresh ideas
on how to leverage their IT investments
for differentiation and advantage.

Behind the change in thinking lies a
simple assumption: that as lT’s potency
and ubiquity have increased, so too has
its strategic value. It’s a reasonable as-
sumption, even an intuitive one. But it’s
mistaken. What makes a resource truly
strategic – what gives it the capacity to
be the basis for a sustained competitive
advantage-is not ubiquity but sc




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